Tag Archives: leaders

The truth about using personality tests for hiring

DispleasureShould I use a personality test for hiring?  Are personality tests legal for hiring?  What are the pros and cons of using personality tests in hiring?

Many people are skeptical about using personality tests for hiring—and they should be.  But not for the reasons you may think.  Personality tests can be extremely effective in screening out problem employees at all levels of the organization, including executives, but they have to be used correctly.

Before even contemplating whether to use a personality test in your hiring process, think about what else you will be using to gather information about the candidates.  A personality test alone is not sufficiently predictive of job performance.  Other factors and methods of assessment need to be included in your hiring process to select good candidates.

What is the best predictor of job performance?

Cognitive ability, or intelligence, is the single best predictor of job performance across all jobs.  If you were to include just one assessment, a test of cognitive ability would be your best bet.  However, many of these tests suffer from adverse impact, which means they predict differently for people in different ethnic groups.  Employment laws and our societal values suggest that we use other measures instead or in combination with intelligence tests to make sure we are giving people of different backgrounds equal opportunities for employment.

What is the worst predictor of job performance?

Interviews are typically the least predictive method of assessment because employers often don’t conduct them in a systematic or uniform way across candidates.  Rather, individual employees typically decide whether they like or connect with the candidate and rate them accordingly.

What methods should I use to assess job candidates?

You may have noticed that we’re talking “apples and oranges” because cognitive ability is a characteristic of a job applicant whereas interviewing is a method of assessing candidates.  This is a very important point and one to carefully consider.  You can measure cognitive ability in an interview, with a test, or with a job sample, or in a number of other ways.  Some of these methods of assessing cognitive ability will be more accurate and more predictive of job performance than others.

The bottom line is you want to choose the right factors to measure and the right methods of assessment to use in your hiring process.  Now, back to personality.

Does personality predict job performance?

Personality is not the best predictor of global job performance, but it will predict certain things that are critical to job performance.  That is, if you use a high quality, multi-factor personality test.  The popular tests that you see out there generally are not appropriate to use for hiring and, if you get sued, you’ll probably lose if you are using them.  What you need is a highly “reliable” and “valid” measure of personality.

Which personality test should I use?

We use several different personality assessment instruments that were designed for hiring.  One of them is the personality test battery in the Hogan Assessments.  We use the Hogan for hiring leaders and executives because it is one of the best assessments of derailing factors.  In other words, the test can tell you how likely the candidate is to exhibit tendencies associated with the dark side of leadership—the kind of leaders you don’t want in your organization, the ones who are out there for themselves, who bully others, who take great risks and give little credit to others and who will run your department, division, or entire organization into the ground if given the chance.

These leaders, unfortunately, are often very good at fooling interviewers, but they are not so good at fooling quality tests of personality, such as the Hogan.  These kinds of tests typically require a qualified person to administer and read the test and often are administered by external consultants, like us.  An external assessment is a great way to get objective data about your candidate to incorporate into your hiring process.  When you look into the cost of such an assessment, you will find that it is far less expensive to assess a few candidates on the front end than to fire a bad leader once they are employed in your company.

Is Your Company Suffering from the Tech Effect?

Teacher and schoolchildren studying in front of a computerRemember when computerized communication technology first came into being?  If you’re too young to know what that was like, it was magical!  We went from waiting impatiently for the mail carrier or staying near the phone to receiving emails and texts in minutes or seconds.  We went from wading through file cabinets and encyclopedias to getting information instantaneously from the internet.  We went from living in siloed communities to being globally connected.  Think about it: we now can access just about anyone or anything at any time!

But, have you noticed how the magic is starting to wear off and anxiety is moving in?

Woman Buying Train Ticket Using Vending Machine At StationBusiness leaders are finding their enterprises rely too much on technology and not enough on people.  Employees are suffering from overwork, owners have lost control over what their employees are doing and saying about their companies, and the general public is suffering from social media addiction.

There’s a longing to slow things down and go back to the personal principles and values that made companies grow and operate better, such as culture and reputation.  Customers and employees are also crying out for privacy, to protect their personal information and to go back to having control of what they share with others.

Ironically, communication technology is the driver of many communication problems.  People are feeling more isolated than ever before, company reputations are suffering, and conflict is rising—and it is costing companies a lot of money.Woman in computer room using personal digital assistant

  • Employees lose an average of one day of work per week to their phones—and they’re getting paid for that day. Nearly 50 percent of people say they can’t live without their phones, which people on average check every 12 minutes and touch 2,600 times a day.
  • American businesses are losing $62 billion per year from poor customer service, according to Forbes Magazine, because of autoresponders and pre-recorded help messages or remote call centers with people who don’t speak the language well.
  • Tesla’s stock dropped over eight percent in a day in response to Elon Musk tweeting he was thinking about taking the company private. Roseanne Barr’s racist tweet cost over $1 billion and 200 people lost their jobs from cancelling all of her shows.

Aggressive furious businessman shouting and working with computer in officeThese problems all have one thing in common, what I call the tech effect.  The tech effect occurs when communication technology loses its human focus and/or the people who use communication technology lose their human focus.  It’s when people communicate with their screens in the form of makeshift messages to ephemeral followers and measure reactions in quantities, instead of building relationships with people.

How do we combat the tech effect?  We need to get the people back in.  Business leaders need to change the culture in their companies to be more human-centered, modify structures and practices within their companies to increase employee and customer engagement and loyalty, and promote healthy, humane work practices and products that sell.

How do we do this?  I have lots of ideas and systematic solutions.  Stay tuned for more on the tech effect