Tag Archives: workplace

What Does a Bad Hire Cost You? 3 Tips for Hiring Good People

working-with-laptopWhat does a bad hire cost you?

Research shows a bad hire can cost your company at least 30% of their salary, but there’s more than just money at stake.  Your personal success is on the line too.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are you working too many hours because you’re covering for an ineffective employee?
  • Is a single employee dragging your whole team down?
  • Are you getting pressure from above to deliver more than your team can accomplish?
  • Are other teams performing better than yours?
  • Is your boss telling you to be tougher on your employees?

If you’ve answered “yes” to any of these questions, you should consider what action to take.  Whether you choose to give the person a chance or let them go depends on a number of factors.  However, you can learn how to avoid this situation in the future by following a better hiring process.

No one is perfect, so the key is to hire someone who has or is able to develop the necessary skills and characteristics to succeed at the job.  Determining that requires a systematic, objective process.

It’s worth investing time and money into a solid assessment of job candidates.  It pays for itself when you have a successful employee and it avoids much greater costs when you don’t.  Plus, it helps protect you against unfair hiring practices that could bring about even costlier litigation.

3 Tips for Hiring Good People

1.      Create a detailed job description

A good assessment process starts with a detailed job description that includes specific behaviors and characteristics necessary to be successful at the job.  For example, an engineering job description might include: “operates computer-assisted engineering or design software or equipment.”  A logistics manager’s job description might include: “maintains metrics, reports, process documentation, customer service logs, and training or safety records.”

2.      Choose predictive assessment methods

Whether you conduct interviews, tests, or job trials, it’s important to do them in a systematic and objective way.  For example, structured interviews with job-relevant questions are better predictors of performance than casual interviews that differ between candidates.  A test of emotional intelligence might be a good fit for candidates for a team leader position.  With tests, however, it’s important to have a qualified person read and interpret the results.

3.      Train people how to assess candidates

Invest in assessment training for those involved in the hiring process.  Teach employees and managers how to interview and how to rate candidates.  Help them understand what questions are good and which ones are either ineffective or illegal.  Walk through the job description with them so they know what they’re looking for in a successful candidate and make sure they ask the same questions to all candidates.

Alternatively…

If your team is strapped for time or just not interested in learning this skill, hire an outside firm to do the assessment for you.  It doesn’t cost that much and it can save you a bundle in the long run.

Bringing Authenticity into the Workplace with Joanie Connell

144-joanie-connell Podcast with guest Joanie Connell

What do you like doing?

Does it make an appearance at your day job?

Bringing more of yourself and who you are at your core into your workplace should be mandatory.

Being authentic in your life and career is more beneficial to your success in your career than being a certain persona that your career molds you to be.

Protect Yourself from Sociopaths at Work

charisma-Recent events have increased my curiosity about sociopaths—terrorists, mass shootings, politicians, The Big Short, and non-criminal business people who use others to get what they want.  I’d like to share what I’ve found.*

Who’s a sociopath?

Sociopaths (or psychopaths or people with antisocial personality disorder) make up about 4 percent of the population.  That’s actually quite high.  Think about 25 people you know personally.  One of them is likely to be a sociopath—a person without a conscience, a person who knows right from wrong but doesn’t care.  Did I get your attention? Continue reading Protect Yourself from Sociopaths at Work

Connecting Generations: Guest Dan Negroni Speaks

I am pleased to support my fellow Generations Expert and San Diegan, Dan Negroni, by sharing some of his tips with you in this post.

We all catch ourselves complaining about the “other” generation—millennials, boomers, Xers, you name it.  Dan says:

  • STOP pointing out problems and saying others are the problem.
  • START asking yourself, “What about me is not connecting and getting results? What am I doing to widen and maintain this gap?”

Continue reading Connecting Generations: Guest Dan Negroni Speaks

Expert Interview: Flying Without a Helicopter, with Joanie Connell, Ph.D.

Discover your talent podcast

Discover Your Talent Podcast Interview:

Flying Without a Helicopter

“Helicopter Parenting”—hovering over and doing too many things for your kids, protecting them, and not letting them learn those skills themselves—is leading to problems when they get older and enter the workplace. Corporate executives often complain about younger people coming into the workplace lacking some of the basic life skills that are necessary to succeed, like being independent, resilient, having good communication skills, and creativity.

Why Is This Important?

“Of course, there are pluses and minuses to every style of parenting. On the one hand, when we’re protecting our kids, we’re keeping them safe. But, on the other hand, when we’re overly protective we’re dis-empowering them, unintentionally depriving them of the opportunities they need to do for themselves…  Listen to the interview.

Follow Your Passion & Fly

Check out the new Charlie EpsteinKilling Retirement podcast to learn how to get the job of your dreams.

Show Notes

The second episode of “Killing Retirement” digs deep into the question: “what do you want to do with your life?” and (more importantly) WHY? Joanie’s focusing on the group of parents she calls “helicopter parents” and the children that come from that parenting style.

Guest: Dr. Joanie Connell

Quote of the ‘Cast: “I’m finding a lot of people that get to the workplace and they weren’t as happy as they thought they would be because their helicoptering parents and teachers have been promising them that there’s a wonderful light at the end of the tunnel after they work so hard during their childhood. They get out there and find that they’re at the bottom of the ladder in the corporate world. They’re not having these amazing jobs that they thought they would have and very dissatisfied that the work is a little bit more boring than they thought it would be a lot of times, more tedious, and just not prepared to do these kinds of things because their parents have been helping them out so much as they grew up.”