Tag Archives: workplace

Organizing Your Mind to See New Perspectives

The BizWiz podcast is a short, 15 minute interview on a targeted business issue.  In this episode, Doug Sandler interviews Joanie Connell on Millennials at work.

Questions you’ll get answers to:

  1. How are Millennials changing the way people do business?
  2. Why is there so much friction between the older and younger generations?
  3. What are some of the myths or stereotypes about Millennials that need to be debunked?
  4. As business leaders and entrepreneurs, what trends do we need to pay attention to that aren’t just passing fads?
  5. What does it take to be a successful leader in a Millennial world?
  6. Why are Millennials facing midlife issues so young? How is it affecting their careers?
  7. Millennials aren’t kids anymore. Many are in their 30s and some are approaching 40. What kinds of challenges are they facing as they approach midlife?

Listen here.

The Key to Shedding Apathy and Reengaging

https://static.pexels.com/photos/36785/soldier-military-uniform-american.jpgPeople sometimes ask me why my work is important.  While I’m normally pretty clear on the impact of the work I do, lately I’ve been questioning it.  Beaten down by daily news of a divided country, threats of war, mass shootings, and natural disasters, it’s hard to think that anything I do makes a difference.  I’m not alone in this thinking.  I run across it with others all the time.

To stay engaged, I have to keep remembering why I do what I do.  I consult, speak, and coach to help people—to help individuals be more successful and happy in their lives and to help organizations be more successful by improving the performance of their people.  No matter what goes on in the world around us, making the world a better place—even at a small level—is important, and that’s what keeps me going.

We all are making the world a better place in one way or another.  The key is to figure out what your impact is and not lose sight of it.

To keep sight of how you are making the world a better place, look at the ways in which you impact the world, either through your work, your organization’s products or services, or in your life outside of work.  Here are some things to consider.

https://static.pexels.com/photos/196652/pexels-photo-196652.jpegHow does your work itself impact the world? Here are some examples of how people’s work positively impacts the world.

  • You provide a service that helps people, like performing surgery to unblock arteries.
  • You provide a service that makes people happier, like teaching meditation to help people relax or doing standup comedy to make people laugh.
  • You increase human knowledge, like conducting scientific research to find cures for diseases or look for life on neighboring planets.
  • You help the earth, like by developing sustainable farming practices or delivering farm-to-table dining.

Even if you work in a seemingly meaningless corporate or government bureaucracy, you still have the ability to make a positive impact in your daily life.  Think about the power you have to improve someone’s day by simply giving them a smile or asking them how their day is going, or by helping them with a task.  You can bring meaning to any job.

https://static.pexels.com/photos/212286/pexels-photo-212286.jpegIf you don’t see how your role impacts people or the world in a significant way, what you do may be part of a bigger organization that has positive impact. How does your organization improve the world?

  • Your organization provides a service that helps people, like healthcare.
  • Your organization provides a service that makes people happier, like entertainment.
  • Your organization increase human knowledge, like through scientific research.
  • Your organization helps the planet, like by developing sustainable energy.

I consulted for one pharmaceutical company that reminded its employees daily that the mission of the company was to save lives.  The company researched, developed, and sold products to manage diabetes and to manage weight loss.  Every single employee at the company was helping to fulfill that mission, whether they were a scientist, an administration assistant, a food service worker, or member of the janitorial staff.  Every job was necessary to save lives.

https://static.pexels.com/photos/302083/pexels-photo-302083.jpegPerhaps your work isn’t your contribution to the world. Rather, you use work as a vehicle to do other things that make an impact.  How do you make an impact on the world through your family, friends, or activities?

  • You raise children or grandchildren or take care of other family members who need it.
  • You give advice and companionship to friends.
  • You volunteer at an animal shelter, school, veterans’ association, museum, or some non-profit organization that is helping make the world a better place.
  • You write, create art, or perform and share your talent with others.
  • You vote.

These are only a few examples of the good that people do and the impact that people have on the world.  Yours may be big or small, but every bit counts.  In fact, these are precisely the things that do count when there is so much negativity that is outside of our control.

What Does a Bad Hire Cost You? 3 Tips for Hiring Good People

working-with-laptopWhat does a bad hire cost you?

Research shows a bad hire can cost your company at least 30% of their salary, but there’s more than just money at stake.  Your personal success is on the line too.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are you working too many hours because you’re covering for an ineffective employee?
  • Is a single employee dragging your whole team down?
  • Are you getting pressure from above to deliver more than your team can accomplish?
  • Are other teams performing better than yours?
  • Is your boss telling you to be tougher on your employees?

If you’ve answered “yes” to any of these questions, you should consider what action to take.  Whether you choose to give the person a chance or let them go depends on a number of factors.  However, you can learn how to avoid this situation in the future by following a better hiring process.

No one is perfect, so the key is to hire someone who has or is able to develop the necessary skills and characteristics to succeed at the job.  Determining that requires a systematic, objective process.

It’s worth investing time and money into a solid assessment of job candidates.  It pays for itself when you have a successful employee and it avoids much greater costs when you don’t.  Plus, it helps protect you against unfair hiring practices that could bring about even costlier litigation.

3 Tips for Hiring Good People

1.      Create a detailed job description

A good assessment process starts with a detailed job description that includes specific behaviors and characteristics necessary to be successful at the job.  For example, an engineering job description might include: “operates computer-assisted engineering or design software or equipment.”  A logistics manager’s job description might include: “maintains metrics, reports, process documentation, customer service logs, and training or safety records.”

2.      Choose predictive assessment methods

Whether you conduct interviews, tests, or job trials, it’s important to do them in a systematic and objective way.  For example, structured interviews with job-relevant questions are better predictors of performance than casual interviews that differ between candidates.  A test of emotional intelligence might be a good fit for candidates for a team leader position.  With tests, however, it’s important to have a qualified person read and interpret the results.

3.      Train people how to assess candidates

Invest in assessment training for those involved in the hiring process.  Teach employees and managers how to interview and how to rate candidates.  Help them understand what questions are good and which ones are either ineffective or illegal.  Walk through the job description with them so they know what they’re looking for in a successful candidate and make sure they ask the same questions to all candidates.

Alternatively…

If your team is strapped for time or just not interested in learning this skill, hire an outside firm to do the assessment for you.  It doesn’t cost that much and it can save you a bundle in the long run.

Bringing Authenticity into the Workplace with Joanie Connell

144-joanie-connell Podcast with guest Joanie Connell

What do you like doing?

Does it make an appearance at your day job?

Bringing more of yourself and who you are at your core into your workplace should be mandatory.

Being authentic in your life and career is more beneficial to your success in your career than being a certain persona that your career molds you to be.

Protect Yourself from Sociopaths at Work

charisma-Recent events have increased my curiosity about sociopaths—terrorists, mass shootings, politicians, The Big Short, and non-criminal business people who use others to get what they want.  I’d like to share what I’ve found.*

Who’s a sociopath?

Sociopaths (or psychopaths or people with antisocial personality disorder) make up about 4 percent of the population.  That’s actually quite high.  Think about 25 people you know personally.  One of them is likely to be a sociopath—a person without a conscience, a person who knows right from wrong but doesn’t care.  Did I get your attention? Continue reading Protect Yourself from Sociopaths at Work

Connecting Generations: Guest Dan Negroni Speaks

I am pleased to support my fellow Generations Expert and San Diegan, Dan Negroni, by sharing some of his tips with you in this post.

We all catch ourselves complaining about the “other” generation—millennials, boomers, Xers, you name it.  Dan says:

  • STOP pointing out problems and saying others are the problem.
  • START asking yourself, “What about me is not connecting and getting results? What am I doing to widen and maintain this gap?”

Continue reading Connecting Generations: Guest Dan Negroni Speaks